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The purchasing of equipment and goods is often thought of as the last step in making your character. It is very important to flesh your character out with the needed equipment and goods, however whether or not you are allowed to purchase them during your character’s creation is up to the GM . The GM may decide to make you wait until after you have started playing to be able to purchase equipment and goods, or my allow you to do so during your character’s creation so that you can start out with some equipment. Regardless on when you are able to make your first purchase you will still need to know and understand the process and how to place the newly purchased equipment on your character.

Sometimes a GM or a Campaign might include a basic list of stuff the characters start with, or sometimes a character might not be allowed to start with anything, including money, and have to find a way to earn it all. You should always check with your GM first before purchasing goods during character creation!

1. Purchasing

Purchasing constitutes the obtaining of goods and services by means of paying, whether it be with money, trade, or equal service. In order to obtain weapons, armor, or other goods from the stores you will have to spend money for them, thus purchase them.

1.1. Methods of Purchase

There are several ways in which you may purchase equipment and goods. The most common way is by spending money. All goods listed in this book will be listed with the default shilling rates, meaning that the price you see listed will be it’s price in shillings. Some campaigns may deal with cryonite or durum. In those cases those campaign books will have the equipment and goods listed in their default currencies. In order to purchase equipment and goods using money, you would simply deduct from your character’s money to pay for what you are wanting to buy. If you do not have enough money, you cannot buy that item.

Another method of purchasing is through trade. However trading for goods requires a trading skill to be used and something to trade for the item you desire. If the item you are trading with isn’t considered as valuable as the item you are wishing to acquire, you may have to trade another item with it, or put up the difference in cash. If the item you are trading with is worth more than the item you are wishing to acquire you may receive the difference in cash.

A less common method of purchasing an item is by providing a service. At the GM’s discretion you may be able to provide work and have the item you are desiring be your payment. The GM may decide to make you make a Personality check to see if the shop owner would be willing to work with you on this or not.

1.2. Decreasing the Asking Price

When purchasing an item, there is a chance that you may be able to decrease the asking price of the item. Besides trading an item of lower value as mentioned above, you can haggle or in some cases use your own materials.

Haggling is the act of talking down the asking price of an item. In order to haggle you would first need the skill called “Haggle”. You would use that skill to get a certain percentage cost off of the item’s asking price. Making a critical mishap with this skill may cause the item to increase by that percentage amount instead. There may be other skills like haggle which may also help you to decrease an item’s asking price.

Haggle is a great skill for beginning characters! It not only gives you the chance to decrease the cost of an item, it also gives you easy skill points that you can earn for your character when purchasing equipment – even during character creation!

When dealing with armor and weapons you are able to provide your own materials which would greatly reduce the cost of the item you are wishing to purchase. You would simply deduct the going rate for your material from the item’s cost to get the new cost. You can find what your material is worth later in “Crafting Supplies”. You can also use the haggle skill or other like skills on the item after having reduced its cost by supplying your own materials to further reduce the item’s cost.

2. Selling

Selling constitutes the relinquishing of goods and services for profit. If you wish to receive any money for your goods you would have to sell them.

In Legends of Nor’Ova, you are able to sell your items for profit. The amount of profit you can hope to gain from selling differs based on what you sell and sometimes on it’s quality. When selling weapons and armor, you would first decrease that item’s cost by half . You would further then decrease the item’s cost based on its wear depending on how low it’s DP is, usually by percentage. The result is how much you would be offered for your weapon or armor. When selling other goods though you will simply be offered half of it’s purchase price. There are skills which you can use to make the price offered even higher. It should be noted however that if you are attempting to sell any armor or weapon that’s DP is at 0 that you will get more money if you simply scrap it and sell the resulting materials.

3. Broken Equipment

Broken Equipment is any equipment that has a DP rating of 0 (zero) or armor with a PR and/or MR of 0. Broken equipment cannot be used and broken armor does not provide any protection.

You can prevent your character's equipment from becoming broken by keeping it repaired when it receives damage. Repairing equipment is almost always cheaper than buying new equipment, and selling fully repaired equipment will get your character more money than selling broken or damaged equipment.

There is a repair skill that you can use to repair your character's equipment, and several magic types have repair magic. If your character cannot use any of these spells or skills, the local blacksmith will be glad to repair your character's equipment for a cost. The base cost is 1.00 Shilling for every 100 DP or 1 PR or 1 MR you wish repaired .

4. Equipping & Using

Equipping purchased weapons and armor on your character is simple. If you wish the item you purchased to be equipped, you simply record the item in it’s appropriate field on the back of your character sheet. There you will see a place for equipped weapons, armor, relics, rings, and storage devices.

But what do you do with items that you do not wish to equip on your character, or that cannot be equipped on your character? For those items you will need to record them on a blank sheet of paper. These items are meant to be placed in your storage devices and therefore you will need to take note of how much space each item takes. When you no longer have space for your items you will not be able to carry anymore items.

Don't forget that you can make your own goods if you have the right skills and abilities, or you can have equipment specially made for your character! Check out the Crafting section for more information.

How you record these items on your paper is up to you. It is recommended that you record as much information about the item that is possible. You definitely will want to know what the item is, what the item does, how much the item weights, and how much space the item takes up. It is your responsibility to know what you have, how much of what you have, and what your items do. If you need any help you should ask your GM for assistance.

How you record these items on your paper is up to you. It is recommended that you record as much information about the item that is possible. You definitely will want to know what the item is, what the item does, how much the item weights, and how much space the item takes up. It is your responsibility to know what you have, how much of what you have, and what your items do. If you need any help you should ask your GM for assistance.

Before you can go and begin purchasing equipment and goods you need to familiarize yourself on what each thing in the item’s listing means and how they fit on your character sheet or on your self-created item sheet (your blank sheet of paper). Below you will find definitions on each term you can expect to find on the item listing tables and where to record them. On the next page is an example of the back of your character sheet is provided showing how to record equipped gear.

Definitions and terms found in the equipment and goods lists:

  • Item: This is the name of the item up for sell. If this is something you plan to equip, you would record this information in the appropriate Item field.

  • Attack: This is how much damage the item will do if attacked with it. Not all items have an attack value. This number is always recorded as a whole number and that item will always do that much damage when you attack with that item. With some items, such as swords or anything that you may use in melee combat, you would add your melee power and offense to the weapon’s attack value for the total damage done with that weapon. When you throw a weapon you will use throw power. Some weapons don’t allow the addition of any of these, such as guns. That is because no strength is used when dealing damage with those weapons. If you are equipping this item attack value would be recorded in the appropriate Attack value field. You may notice that not all locations have a field present for Attack value. This is because not all locations have items which may cause damage.

  • Block: This is how much damage you can block against with a weapon. You will note that only weapons and shields have block value. To use an item’s Block Value, you would first have to have a blocking skill. There are several such skills available. When you successfully block with an item, its block value will be taken from the damage that would be dealt to your character, reducing the amount of damage that your character will receive. If the Block Value is greater than the damage dealt then you would receive no damage. Not all weapons have a block value, only weapons that would be large enough to considerably block damage from you. If you are equipping an item that has Block value, you would record your item’s Block Value in the appropriate Block field. You can only use one item’s block value at a time unless you are duo-wielding. At that time you can use both item’s block value.

  • PR: PR stands for Physical Resistance. This is provided by your character's armor. Any damage done against your character must first surpass your character's PR. If the damage is not greater than your character's PR, your character will not take any damage. If the damage is greater that your character's PR, only the amount that is greater will harm your character. Your character's armor will take damage and its PR will decrease because of this. This is all more explained in Combat. Your armor's PR value stacks on top of any other item that is equipped and has a PR, giving you a larger total PR. Only armor has a PR value. If you are equipping any item that has a PR value, you would record it in the appropriate PR value field.

  • MR: MR stands for Magical Resistance. This is provided by your character's armor. Any magical damage done against your character must first surpass your character's MR. If the magical damage is not greater than your character's MR, your character will not take any damage. If the magical damage is greater that your character's MR, only the amount that is greater will harm your character. Your character's armor will take damage and its MR will decrease because of this. This is all more explained in Combat. Your armor's MR value stacks on top of any other item that is equipped and has MR, giving you a larger total MR. Only armor has a MR value. If you are equipping any item that has a MR value, you would record it in the appropriate MR value field.

  • Natural PR and MR: Natural PR and MR is any armor that is naturally provided by your race. When you are attacked, this value will be added to your armor's PR and MR to better protect your character. Unlike armor though, natural PR and MR will never decrease as your character is attacked. Armor will not provide a natural PR or MR value.

  • DP: DP stands for Durability Points. It is similar to your character’s HP, except it is the ‘life’ of your item. The better the item’s DP is, the stronger the item is and the better condition it is in. When an item’s DP drops to zero, that item will break and be completely useless. Weapons and shields have DP, but armor does not.

  • Range: Range shows the range of your item. This always applies to weapons and never to armor. It shows how far in hexes an item will reach. If you are equipping an item that has a Range value, you would record it in the appropriate Range field for that item.

  • Weight: This is how much the item weights in pounds. Many times you will see the item’s weight is less than a full pound. You will still need to record this weight. Everything that has weight and is on your character, whether equipped or in a storage container such as a back pack, will add together to show how much weight your character is carrying. You do not want this weight to exceed your character’s weight limit. If you are equipping an item, you would record it’s weight in the appropriate Weight field for that item. You will also need to record the weight of your stored goods on your blank sheet of paper.

  • Rune Stone: This shows what Rune Stone, if any, has been applied to a particular item. You will never find an item for sell with a rune stone already attached. Therefore you will want to provide your own, or you may find an item with an attached rune stone in your adventuring. Regardless, if you are equipping an item that has a rune stone attached to it, you will record that information in the appropriate Rune Stone field for that item.

  • Effects: This is any effects given by the item. This only applies to relics and rings and the like. If you equip any items that has listed effects, you would record this information in their appropriate fields for their items.

  • Storage Space: This is where you would show how much storage space a storage device give you.

  • Other Armor Information:This is where you would put any other information that is important for your armor, such as the penalty for sneaking.

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