The next step in the character creation process deals with determining your character’s stats. This is a very crucial and important step as these stats will determine your character’s strengths and weaknesses. While the stats will change throughout the game play, the way you set your stats now will determine how well your character can progress and grow in certain areas. Therefore it is very important that you take your time on this step, make sure you understand the process completely, and know how each stat functions. The game master should be present with you when doing this step to ensure that you are following the procedure correctly and to help answer any questions you may have.

It may be a good idea to keep this section bookmarked, and maybe even print off a copy for your character folder. This section will deal not only with generating stats for character creation, but also provide definitions on the various stats and tables that show percentage stats and other derived stat progressions. This section may be one of the sections of this book that you refer to often.

Most players who play this game will already have experience with other role-playing games. Therefore they may think they understand what the stats are and wish to jump ahead with stat generation and rush through the procedure. This is very unwise and could give them a character that does not work the way they wanted the character to. Please note that while some stats may seem familiar, like HP for example, you should take the time to make sure that the stat functions in the same way you are accustomed to in other games. Also there are many stats here that are not present in other game systems and you will want to understand how they function so that you can make the best use of them for your character.

Before continuing on with this important step in character creation, you need to make sure that you have already completed the following steps:

  • Have you chosen your character's Runic Element yet? If not, you need to do so.

  • Have you recorded the stat bonuses that the chosen Runic Element gives to your character?

  • Have you recorded the effects on magical attack and magical defense provided by your character's Runic Element?

  • Have you chosen a race yet? It is very important to choose a race before completing this step.

  • Have you recorded your chosen race's Race Maximum stat and Starting Stats?

  • Have you recorded any and all bonuses given by your character's race, including stat bonuses?

  • Have you recorded your character's build (and all other descriptive information)?

  • Have you recorded your character's racial skills (skills provided by your chosen race)?

  • If you wish to use the Character Origins Generator, have you done so yet? You need to do so before determining stats and starting currency.

If you have complete the above important steps, then you can safely continue on with this step. If you haven't, then you need to do so now. Otherwise your character's stats will be wrong.

1. Generating a Point Pool

The very first step you will undertake to create stats for your character is to generate a point pool. The point pool will be used to determine your character's stats. To create a point pool, you will need the following items:

  • A 1d10 (one 10-sided dice).

  • You will need a piece of scrap paper to record your dice rolls on.

  • You may want to have a calculator, as you will be adding up your dice rolls.

  • You should already have a pencil. You never want to complete your character sheet with a pen.

Once you have your supplies ready follow these steps to generate your point pool:

1.1. Quick Guide

Stat Point Pool Creation:
Step 1: Roll 1d10 15 times, record each number.
Step 2: Roll one 10-sided dice. This is number of rerolls.
Step 3: Add together 15 numbers. This is your point pool.

Skill Point Pool: Initial Skill Points is equal to your point pool.

  • Step 1: Roll your 1d10 and record the number shown. You will repeat this step fourteen more times so that you have recorded fifteen (15) numbers.

  • Step 2: Once you have completed Step 1, your GM will roll, or let you roll, one ten-sided dice. The number shown on this dice is how many re-rolls you have. If the dice shows a 1, then you can re-roll one of your twenty numbers from Step 1. If the dice shows a 10 or a 0, then you have ten re-rolls that you can use. You do not have to use all of your re-rolls, or any re-rolls. However the number you re-roll for is replaced by the new number. So if you re-rolled for a 15, and got a 3, that 15 is replaced by that 3, despite the 3 being a lower number. You can re-roll a number again if you have enough re-rolls left. Once you are out of re-rolls, or are done using your re-rolls, proceed to Step 3.

  • Step 3: Once you have completed Step 2 you will need to add all of your fifteen numbers together. The sum is your point pool.

1.2. Initial Skill Points 

Skill Points are what you will use to acquire skills for your character, as well as to master skills, improve skills, obtain new runic elemental effects, and obtain talents. Therefore, skill points are a very important “stat” for your character. We will go into more depth regarding skill points later on, but for now you simply need to know how you will acquire your character's initial amount of skill points.

 The inital skill points is not decreased when you use points from your point pool, nor does taking your skill points change or decrease from your point pool. The two are seperate pools.

Your character's initial skill points, the very amount that you will use to acquire your character's first skills, is equal to your total point pool

If, for example, the point pool you created is 100, your character will have 100 skill points to start with. If your point pool is 120, your character will have 120 skill points to start with, or if your point pool is 80, your character will have 80 skill points to start with. You simply take what ever your total point pool is and that is how many skill points you get for character creation.

2. Assigning Stats

Now that you have your point pool generated and have your initial skill points, it is time to assign stats to your character.

You have six main stats that you can assign stat points to. These are FortitudeSpeedMentalStrengthLuck, and Will. You cannot exceed your character’s race maximum caps when assigning points, meaning if the race maximum for Speed is 100, you can not put more than 100 points into the stat field for Speed. You will already have some points in your stat fields from starting stats and bonuses given to you from your character’s runic element and race. Those points are free points for that particular stat. Just because there are points there doesn’t mean you can exceed your character’s race maximum for that stat. Therefore if you already have 20 points in Fortitude from your character’s runic element, and your race maximum for Fortitude is 100, you can only add 80 points into that stat. You cannot go over by 20 points.

Balancing your characters stats might seem like a good idea at first, however, you will quickly find that such a character is more difficult to play and not near as fun. Instead, you should strive to make your characters stats reflect the kind of character you want to play.

You should not try to balance your character out. While stats themselves can change, balancing your stats will still provide a weaker character that is more difficult to play and one which will become boring to play. Instead you should strive to make your character reflect how you wish to play him or her by giving more stat points to the stats you feel you will use more. You could go based on the race maximums by giving more stat points to the stats that have the highest race maximums if you plan to play to the strengths of your character's race.

While assigning stat points, you may be confused by some of the fields that are available. Here is a quick run down on those fields.

  • Stat: This is where you will put your stat points into.
  • Race Max: This number shows the limit for that particular stat based on your character’s race. Your stat will never exceed your race maximum.

2.1. What are the Main Stats?

Main Stats are the stats that you will personally put points into. These are the stats that you will create your initial stats for and add stat points to when you earn them. These stats
affects all other stats. Racial Maximums determine the highest that these stats can ever reach.

  • Fortitude: Fortitude is basically your character’s ability to bear and deal with pain. Fortitude is an important stat that deals with your character’s defensive abilities and your character’s overall health. Fortitude is a main stat, one which you will be placing in stat points when determining your character’s stats and through out your game play. It is not a
    stat that would decrease from use. Fortitude affects HP.
  • Speed: Speed is basically how fast your character is. This stat determines how fast your character can move and react. Speed is used for such things as movement rate, hand speed, initiative, and reflexes. Stats based on speed are Evade %, Aim, Initiative, and Movement Rates. Speed is a main stat with which you will be assigning stat points when determining your character’s stats and throughout game play. Sometimes a speed check can be used to determine if your character was fast enough to preform or avoid a certain situations.
  • Mental: Mental is a stat that illustrates your character’s over all intelligence and ability to learn. Mental determines how fast your character can learn and master a skill.  Mental not only determines how fast you will be able to learn and master skills, it also deals with your character’s use and defense against magic. Mental is a main stat, one which you will place stat points into when determining your stats and throughout game play. Mental effects not only SA but also Magic Power, Perception %, Success Rate, and Failure Rate.
  • Strength: Strength is a stat which measures how strong your character is physically. This is crucial when determining how much weight your character can carry, how much your character can lift with one arm, what your character’s offensive damage is, and even how much endurance your character has. Strength not only affects EP, but also Melee Power, Throw Power, Bow Power, Throw Range, Jump Up Range, Jump Across Range, Carry Weight Limit, Lifting 1-Hand Weight Limit, and Lifting 2-Hands Weight Limit.
  • Luck: Luck basically shows how lucky your character is. The higher your character’s luck is the lucky your character is. Luck can be used for all sorts of situations, from determining encounters, to dealing with finding certain treasures, spoils after combat, and even barely surviving a potentially fatal situation. Luck is the main attributing stat in determining Critical Hit %, Critical Magic %, treasure finds, and situations where only luck could prove as an explanation. Luck is a main stat, one which you will be placing stat points in when determining your character’s stats and throughout game play.
  • Will: Will is your character’s ability to withstand persuasions, influences, fear, and other mental attributes. The higher your character’s Will is, the more successful your character will be at maintaining self and not being influenced by outside forces. For example, if someone tries to persuade your character to do something your character does not wish to do, the game master may ask you to make a will check. You would roll percent dice, trying to reach whatever your Will stat is or below. If you succeed, you can continue playing your character not falling for their antics and doing whatever you rather do. However should you fail, your character would give in to the persuasion and do whatever that other character wanted your character to do, despite your wishes or your character’s wishes. The same can be said of events like fear, making a will check to see if your character can withstand the fear or runs away in fear. Will affects and determines your character's Influence % stat. Will is a main stat, one which you will be placing stat points in when determining your character’s stats and throughout game play.

3. Derived Stats

Now that you have determined your character's main stats, it is time to complete the stat portion of your character sheet. To do so, we will need to determine your character's derived stats. Derived stats are stats that are based on your character's main stats. You won't put any points from your point pool here. Instead you will follow the intructions below using your character's main stats to determine your character's derived stats.

If your character has any modifiers from your character's race or runic element (or any other source) for derived stats, you should not add those to your character's derived stats. Instead, you should list them in the modifier field for that stat. The reason you don't want to add them directly to the derived stat is so you won't get confused later when making sure your derived stats have been updated to reflect any changes to your main stats.

3.1. Vitals

Vitals are the stats that you refer to to determine the life and energy of your character. These stats are HP, SA, and EP. You will not place any stat points into these stats but your race or element might have a modifier for these stats. These stats are directly determined by your character's main stats.

  • HP: HP stands for Health Points. This stat is basically your character’s life. Taking damage whether by getting hurt or by poisons causes your character’s HP to decrease. Taking potions and significant rest as well as healing skills and spells can cause your character’s HP to recover. It should be noted that once your character’s HP reaches zero (0), your character is considered dead. It is important to consider the strengths and weaknesses of your character and plan accordingly. A character with a lower HP would be wise to have a good selection of healing skills and spells, the best armor they can afford, and a good selection of potions for healing and revival purposes. They would also be wise to have at least one other character accompany them that can revive them if needed. HP is a derived stat and thus when you generate your stats, you will not be assigning a number to HP. Instead HP is based directly on Fortitude. HP is double your character's fortitude (HP = Fortitude x 2).

  • SA: SA stands for Skill Ability. This stat is your character’s capacity to use skills and spells. But SA isn’t used by all types of skills. The types of skills that use SA usually are skills that require thought or mental conditioning. Skills that require raw energy would depend upon another stat. There are potions and skills that help recover spent SA, and significant rest also will recover spent SA. Once your character has spent all of his or her SA they cannot use skills that require SA. SA is a derived stat and thus when you generate your stats, you will not be assigning a number to SA. Instead SA is based directly off of Mental. SA is double your character's mental (SA = Mental x 2).

  • EP: EP stands for Endurance Points. This stat is your character’s endurance. In other words it shows how much physical activity and physical strain your character can handle. Skills that use raw power and could tire your character out such as attacking skills use EP. Also going too long without rest, food, or water can drain your character’s EP as can being in weather conditions your character is not accustomed to such as too hot or too cold weather. There are some potions that restore lost EP, but generally the best method of recovering EP is to eat good meals, drink plenty of fluids, and get significant rest. Once your character has spent all of his or her EP, your character can no longer use skills that require EP, your character's physical attacks are halved, and your character's movement rates are halved. EP is a derived stat and thus when you generate your stats, you will not be assigning a number to EP. Instead EP is based directly off of Strength. EP is double your character's strength (EP = Strength x 2).

3.2. Armor Stats

Armor Stats are just that, stats determined by your character's armor. You will not be placing any stat points into armor stats, nor are they determined by your main stats. We are simply going over them here so that you understand what they are and what they mean. The only possible exceptions would be natural PR and natural MR as your character's race could provide some natural PR and/or MR.

  • PR: PR stands for Physical Resistance. This is provided by your character's armor. Any damage done against your character must first surpass your character's PR. If the damage is not greater than your character's PR, your character will not take any damage. If the damage is greater that your character's PR, only the amount that is greater will harm your character. Your character's armor will take damage and its MR will decrease because of this. This is all more explained in Combat.

  • MR: MR stands for Magical Resistance. This is provided by your character's armor. Any magical damage done against your character must first surpass your character's MR. If the magical damage is not greater than your character's MR, your character will not take any damage. If the magical damage is greater that your character's MR, only the amount that is greater will harm your character. Your character's armor will take damage and its MR will decrease because of this. This is all more explained in Combat.

  • Natural PR and MR: Natural PR and MR is any armor that is naturally provided by your race. When you are attacked, this value will be added to your armor's PR and MR to better protect your character. Unlike armor though, natural PR and MR will never decrease as your character is attacked.

  • Block: This is how much damage you can block against with a weapon, shield, or bracer. To use an item’s Block Value, you would first have to have a blocking skill. There are several such skills available. When you successfully block with an item, its block value will be taken from the damage that would be dealt to your character, reducing the amount of damage that your character will receive. If the Block Value is greater than the damage dealt then you would receive no damage. You can only use one item’s block value at a time unless you are duel-wielding. At that time you can use both item’s block value.

3.3. Secondary Stats

Secondary Stats are stats that are determined by the Main Stats. You will not be assigning any stat points here. Instead these stats will be determined by their corresponding main stat.

Secondary stats are the stats that you will use most often as these will help you to determine what your character can do and how well he or she can do it. Some examples are helping you to determine when it is your turn in battle, how well you can spot hard to see things, how much you can carry, how far you can move, and how hard you can hit.

3.3.1. Initiative

Initiative: Initiative is a stat which helps determine who will go first in battle. You will add it to whatever you roll on a 1d20 at the start of battle, and the one with the higher roll plus initiative goes first. Initiative is determined by speed. Race and armor can affect Initiative. Your character's initiative stat is the first digit of your character's speed stat. If your character's speed is 8 (read as 08), your character's initiative would be 0. If your character's speed is 38, your character's initiative would be 3.

3.3.2. Influence

Influence %: Influence shows how influential your character is. This is a stat that would come into play whenever you are trying to influence, convince, or even charm others. Having a high Influence could help your character negate social and cultural differences that might otherwise impede your character, and may help your character avoid sticky situations such as unwanted fights and jail time.  Influence % is based on your character’s Will stat, therefore you will not be placing a number here when assigning stats. Your character's Influence is is equal to your character's Will stat. If your charater has a will of 42, your character will have an influence % of 42. This is based on plain Will stat without any modifiers.

3.3.3. Perception

Perception %: Perception % is your character’s chance at noticing things that are normally hard to notice. These things can be sounds that are hard to hear such as muffled communication or light foot steps, hard to see trip wires attached to traps, slight differences in your character’s surroundings, and so on. It is really up to the game master to determine what is hard to notice and if a perception check is needed to notice something. Perception checks should never be needed to see, hear, or notice things that are easily noticed or very apparent, such as yelling, close loud gunshots or explosions, very apparent changes in scenery, and so forth. A failed perception check is usually interpreted to mean that the character was completely blind and unable to see the obvious. This is just not true. While the character would not notice something that is hard to notice in the first place with a failed perception check, the character would notice other things that are apparent. For example, the character may not notice the trip wire that sets off the trap but would notice the huge blade hanging from the ceiling that is the trap before setting it off. Perception % is based on your character’s Mental stat, therefore you will not be placing a number here when assigning stats. Your character's Perception % is 1/2 of your character's Mental stat + 10. If your character's Mental stat is 30, your character's Perception % will be 25. If your character's Mental stat is 80, your character's Perception % will be 50.

3.3.4. Aim

Aim: Aim is how well you can aim at something and hit it with a thrown object or a projectile weapon. This is a stat check that you will need to make to hit anything with a thrown object or a projectile weapon. It is based on your character's Speed stat. Your character's Aim is (Speed / 2) + 20. If your character has a Speed stat of 30, your character's Aim is 35. The highest Aim will reach based on stats alone is 70. To get an even better aim, you will need to master skills and acquire abilities.

3.3.5. Actions

Actions: Actions are best described as how quickly you can act in a certain circumstance. They do not really represent how many times you can act. You can only move and act once per round no mater how many actions you have. Instead, certain skills and spells or certain things that you are trying to do may take more actions to show how long they would take to perform. If you have 2 Magic Actions for example, and a spell costs 2 Magic actions or less, then you can cast that spell right away. If the spell costs more than 2 Magic Actions, you would begin casting the spell, but it would not cast until the needed action cost is spent. This will be further explained in Combat. Actions are set and only effected by race, ability, talent, or skill. Actions are only ever used in combat.

  • Attack Actions: Attack Actions are used for offensive skills and activities. Most take only 1 Attack action, but some may take more. The base Attack Actions is 1 which does not increase based on stats.
  • Defense Actions: Defense Actions are used for defensive skills and activities, such as evasion, per attacker. Unless you have a modifier, your character will always have a base defense actions of 1 which do not increase.
  • Support Actions: Support Actions are used by support skills and supportive activities, like changing equipment or drinking a potion. Unless you have a modifier, your character will always have a base support actions of 1 which do not increase.
  • Magic Actions: Magic Actions are used by magic spells. The more powerful the spell, the more magic actions it will cost. Unless you have a modifier, your character will always have a base magic actions of 1 which do not increase.

3.3.6. Movement Rates

Movement Rates: The movement stats identify how far your character can move in a given time and in a given environment. Movement stats are categorized into three types based on the general situations involved. These movement stats are World, Area, and Battle. Movement stats is based on your character’s Speed, therefore you will not be placing a number here when assigning stats.

  • World: This is how far your character can travel on a world map each hour. World maps are maps that cover a large area of land meant to be measured in miles instead of feet. Thus movement across a world map represents movement over a very large area of land. Your character's World Movement Rate is the first digit of your character's Speed stat. So if your character's Speed stat is 10, your character's World Movement Rate is 1. If your character's Speed stat is 36, your character's World Movement Rate will be 3.
  • Area: This is how far your character can travel on an area map within one hour. Area maps are maps that cover a small area, such as towns or dungeons. Distances in these maps are measured in feet and thus the movement rate may seem higher than world map movement, but in reality the reverse is true. To determine your character's Area Movement Rate, simply take the first digit of your character's Speed stat X 10. So if your character's Speed stat is 10, your character's Area Movement Rate is 10. If your character's Speed stat is 48, your character's Area Movement Rate will be 40.
  • Battle: This is how far your character can travel on a battlefield map with one movement. Battlefield maps typically cover a smaller area than area maps, focusing on where the action takes place. However the time spent in the battle is counted in minutes and not hours. Thus the battle movement rate may seem very small when in fact it represents movement over a shorter time period. To determine your character's Battle Movement Rate, simply take the first digit of your character's Speed stat + 3. So if your character's Speed stat is 10, your character's Battle Movement Rate is 4. If your character's Speed stat is 59, your character's Battle Movement Rate will be 8.

3.3.7. Weight Limits

Weight Limits: Weight Limits shows how much your character can carry on his or her back and lift with one or two hands. It is broken up into the following stats: Carry, Lift 1-H, and Lift 2-H. These stats are based on your character's Strength and Build, so you will not be putting any points into these stats from your point pool.

  • Carry: Carry is short for Carry Weight Limit, and is the maximum amount of weight your character can carry without feeling the effects of being overburdened. While this can mean carrying things in your arms, it also means on your back or anywhere else. This includes armor being worn, items in a carrying sack, weapons on your belt, and even the shoes on your feet. Carry however does not dictate how much weight your character can lift, it only shows how much weight your character’s body can carry once the weight is already upon them. As long as the load the character is carrying is at or below their carry limit there are no ill effects upon your character. Your character will continue to move at his or her normal rate, be able to climb, swim and even jump as far or as fast as they could if they weren’t carrying any weight at all. However once your character’s load goes over their carry limit ill effects begin to creep up. For every 10 pounds over the weight limit your character’s actions will decrease by 1, your character’s movement rates will decrease by half, and your character’s jump rate will decrease by 1.
  • Lift 1-H: Lift 1-H is short for Lifting 1-Hand Weight Limit. Lift 1-H is the amount of weight your character can lift with one arm or hand without feeling the effects of being overburdened. This is usually used when dealing with weapons. For example, if the sword or axe weighs more than the character can lift, the character may have a harder time using that weapon. However this can also be used to determine if the character can pick up or lift something such as a heavy bag, a body, a piece of armor, or a gate. Lifting 1-H does not dictate how much your character can carry. Once you have lifted the item if you continue to hold it in your arms you are no longer lifting, but carrying, and that would depend upon your character’s carry limit. However using a sword or any other weapon in battle usually requires such actions as swinging and chopping which mimic lifting, and thus with a weapon you will always be using the Lifting Limit. If the object weights more than your character can lift with one hand then your character must use both hands.
  • Lift 2-H: Lift 2-H is short for Lifting 2-Hand Weight Limit. Lift 2-H is the amount of weight your character can lift with two arms or hands without feeling the effects of being overburdened. This is usually used when dealing with weapons. For example, if the sword or axe weighs more than the character can lift, the character may have a harder time using that weapon. However this can also be used to determine if the character can pick up or lift something such as a heavy bag, a body, a piece of armor, or a gate. Lifting 2-H does not dictate how much your character can carry. Once you have lifted the item if you continue to hold it in your arms you are no longer lifting, but carrying, and that would depend upon your character’s carry limit. However using a sword or any other weapon in battle usually requires such actions as swinging and chopping which mimic lifting, and thus with a weapon you will always be using the Lifting Limit. If the object weights more than your character can lift with two arms or hands, then your character will not be able to lift the object without a strength check, with the amount of the weight that is more than the lifting limit as the penalty. For example, if your character was trying to lift a heavy rock to move it out of the way, and the rock weighed 33 pounds and your character's Lifting 2-H was 20, your character would need to make a strength check minus 13 points (33-20 = 13).

 

BuildCarry FormulaLift 1-H FormulaLift 2-H Formula
Dwarf-Small 4 x Strength Carry / 6 Carry /3 or Lift 1-H x 2
Dwarf-Medium (4 x Strength) + 20
Small 3 x Strength
Medium (3 x Strength) + 20
Large-Buff (5 x Strength) + 10
Large-Fat 4 x Strength
Orc-Large 8 x Strength
Dragon-Large 10 x Strength

 

3.3.8. Ranges

Ranges: This is a category of stats that shows how strength affects certain ranges. The types of ranges affected by strength are Throw Range, Jump Up range, and Jump Across Range. Rage stats are based on your character's Strength, so you will not be putting any points into these stats from your point pool.

  • Throw: Throw stands for Throw Range and shows how far your character can throw an object that your character can lift. Therefore if your character can lift 50 pounds and you are wanting to throw a 50 pound boulder, and your throw range is 5, your character would be able to throw that boulder 5 hex. However if that boulder weighed 60 pounds your character would not be able to throw it. Weighing less than what your character can lift, with either one or both hands, does not have any effect on your character's throw range. Your character's Throw Range will be different in battle than in area maps. Your character's Area Throw Range is the first digit of your character's Strength. Your character's Battle Throw Range is the first digit of your character's Strength x 2.

  • Jump Up: Jump Up Range is based on Speed. This stat shows how high your character can jump depending upon your character's Speed stat. The faster your character is, the higher up in the air your character can jump. Your character's Jump Up range will be different in battle than in area. In Area Maps while adventuring it is called Area Up. In battle it is called Battle Up. Your character's Area Jump Up range is the first digit of your character's Speed. Your character's Battle Jump Up Range is the first digit of your character's Speed x 2.

  • Across: Across is short for Jump Across. Jump Across Range is based on Speed. This stat shows how far your character can jump . The faster your character is, the farther across your character can jump. Your character's Jump Across range will be different in battle than in area. In Area Maps while adventuring it is called Area Across. In battle it is called Battle Across. Your character's Area Jump Across range is the first digit of your character's Speed + 2. Your character's Battle Jump Across Range is the first digit of your character's Speed +2, multiply that by 2.

3.3.9. Evade

Evade %: Evade % is your character’s chance at evasion. Basically it is a stat that is used to evade or dodge an attack or any situation that would require dodging. Should your character successfully evade, which is done by rolling the Evade % stat or lower with percentile dice, then your character would take absolutely zero (0) damage. Evade % is based on your character’s Speed, Mental, and Luck, therefore you will not be placing a number here when assigning stats. To determine your character's Evade %, simply take your character's Speed + Mental + Luck and divide that answer by 3. Round that answer up to the nearest whole number and you will have your character's Evade %. So if your character's Speed stat is 10, Mental is 25, and Luck is 8, your character's Evade % is 15.

There are certain situations that can give you a penalty to your evade check. Below is a table showing those situations and penalties. Please note that this is a simple table. For more detailed information, please refer to Combat Rules - Defensive Round for more details.

Evade SituationEvade Penalty
Direct Melee Attack from the Front or Thrown Object, Seen Single Target Spells No Penalty
Distracted, Attack from Side or Behind -5 to Evade %
Most Projectiles (including Rune Cannons) -20 to Evade %
Invisible or Very Fast Single Target Spells -25 to Evade %
Guns -50 to Evade %

3.3.10. Offense

Offense: These are the derived stats that deal with how Strength affects your offensive power. These stats are Melee Power, Throw Power, and Bow Power. All of these stats are based on your character''s Strength stat, so you will not be assigning any stat points here.

  • Melee: This is short for Melee Power. Melee Power is a number that you will add to your damage. You would use Melee only for melee (hand-held) weapons, when hitting the target with that hand-held weapon, or with your body part. Your character's Melee Power is the first digit of your character's Strength stat.
  • Throw: This is short for Throw Power. Throw Power is a number that you will add to your damage. You would use Throw only for thrown weapon damage, when hitting the target with that thrown weapon. Your character's Throw Power is the first digit of your character's Strength stat +2.
  • Bow: This is short for Bow Power. Bow Power is a number that you will add to your bow and arrow damage. You would use Bow only for bow and arrow damage, when hitting the target with arrow shot from your bow. Your character's Bow Power is the first digit of your character's Strength stat -2 (but never less than 1).
  • Critical: This is Critical Hit %. This stat is a chance to do critical damage when attacking using a melee weapon (or attack), thrown weapon, or bow and arrow. Unlike the others, Critical Hit % is not based solely on your character's Strength Stat, but on a combination of Strength and Luck. The reward for a successful Critical Hit % roll would be increasing the total damaging value of the attack by x 1.25. If you make a critical on a Critical Hit % check, in other words if you roll a 001, you would get to make a death blow check, that is roll a 1d6 and if a 6 is rolled, the target is killed instantly; if a 6 isn't rolled, it is treated as a normal crit. To determine your character''s Critical Hit % you use this formula: (Luck + Strength) / 2.  The maximum Critical Stat is 95.

3.3.11. Magical Damages

  • Magic Power: This stat is a base power which you would add to your character's spells. You would only add this to any spells that have a damaging or healing value. If a spell does not do damage or does not heal or restore HP, SA, or EP, then you would not add this to the spell. You would add this to poisoning damage and the like as well. Some weapons, such as rune cannons, use your character's magic power instead of offense power. Magic Power is based on Mental. Your character's Magic Power is the first digit of your character's Mental stat. If your character's Mental stat is less than 10, then your character's Magic Power is 0.
  • Critical: This is Critical Magic %. This stat is a chance to do critical damage or critical healing when using a spell. Unlike the others, Critical Magic % is not based solely on your character's Mental Stat, but on a combination of Mental and Luck. The reward for a successful Critical Magic % roll would be increasing the total damaging or healing value of the cast spell by x 1.25. If you make a critical on a Critical Hit % check, in other words if you roll a 001, you would get to make an epic casting check, that is roll a 1d6 and if a 6 is rolled, the target is killed or fully restored instantly (depending upon whether the spell does damages or heals); if a 6 isn't rolled, it is treated as a normal crit. You would make this roll only on spells that do immediate healing or damaging effects, so you could not use this stat with poisons or slow regeneration effects. When using weapons powered by magic, such as rune cannons, you'd use Critical Magic % in place of Critical Hit %. To determine your character's Critical Magic % you use this formula: (Luck + Mental) / 2. The maximum Critical Stat is 95.

3.3.12. Success and Failure Points Rates

  • Success Points Rate: This stands for Success Rate for gaining skill points. Success Rate illustrates your character's rate at gaining skill points upon successful use of his or her skills. We will go into this in more detail in the Character Progression and Growth section. What is important to understand is that Success Rate is based entirely on Mental, can be improved dramatically by skills and talents, and greatly reflects your character's rate of skill point gaining. You will not assign any points here. Your character's Success Rate is your the first digit of your character's Mental stat +1.
  • Failure  Points Rate: This stands for Failure Rate for gaining skill points. Failure Rate illustrates your character''s rate at gaining skill points upon trying to use a skill, but failing at it. Your character will gain these points because even though your character failed, he or she can learn from that failure. We will go into this in more detail in the Character Progression and Growth section. What is important to understand is that Failure Rate is based entirely on Mental, can be improved dramatically by skills and talents, and greatly reflects your character's rate of skill point gaining. You will not assign any points here. Your character's Success Rate is your the first digit of your character's Mental stat -1, but never less than 1.

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